World War 3: Saudi Arabia vs. Iran The Battle for Islam

World War 3: Saudi Arabia vs. Iran The Battle for Islam

World War 3: Saudi Arabia vs. Iran The Battle for Islam

As the world faces increasing threats in North Korea and in Turkey a new and equally dangerous conflict is taking shape in the Middle East.

Riyadh appears to be mobilizing for a confrontation with the Iran.

“We know we are a main target of Iran,” speculated Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MbS) in an interview early this month.

Then came the threat. “We are not waiting until there becomes a battle in Saudi Arabia, so we will work so that it becomes a battle for them in Iran and not in Saudi Arabia.”

These are fighting words indeed. The Iranians certainly thought so, Defense Minister Hossein Dehghan responding with unusual ferocity: “We warn them (Saudis) against doing anything ignorant, but if they do something ignorant, we will leave nowhere untouched apart from Mecca and Medina.”

In other words, if the Saudis launch direct aggression against Iran, this will be Riyadh’s last war anywhere, ever.

Over the last decade we have seen an increasingly aggressive Saudi Arabia, at war Iranian/Shia enemies.

This is the Battle for Islam

In Yemen, where the two-year Saudi bombing blitz has killed over 10,000 civilians, in Bahrain, where Saudi troops and tanks snuffed out dissent in the Shia-majority state, in Syria, where Saudis send weapons, cash and support to ISIS, Al-Qaeda and other head-chopping extremists. This Saudi hysteria has now touched every corner of the world, and by the $100+ billion Riyadh has invested in radical schools, mosques, and propaganda to indoctrinate an entire generation of Muslims in Wahhabi-style intolerance.

Sunni Islam and Shia Islam are the two major denominations of Islam. Their division traces back to a Sunni–Shia schism following the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad in the year 632. A dispute over succession to Muhammad as a caliph of the Islamic community spread across various parts of the world, which led to the Battle of Jamal and Battle of Siffin. The dispute intensified greatly after the Battle of Karbala, in which Hussein ibn Ali and his household were killed by the ruling Umayyad Caliph Yazid I, and the outcry for revenge divided the early Islamic community.

The present demographic breakdown between the two denominations is difficult to assess and varies by source, but a good approximation is that 85–90% of the world’s Muslims are Sunni and 10–15% are Shia, with most Shias belonging to the Twelver tradition and the rest divided between many other groups.Sunnis are a majority in most Muslim communities: in Southeast Asia, China, South Asia, Africa, and most of the Arab world. Shia make up the majority of the citizen population in Iraq, Bahrain, Lebanon, Iran and Azerbaijan, as well as being a politically significant minority in Pakistan, Syria and Yemen. Azerbaijan is predominantly Shia; however, practicing adherents are much fewer. Indonesia has the largest number of Sunni Muslims, while Iran has the largest number of Shia Muslims (Twelver) in the world. Pakistan has the second-largest Sunni. India has the second-largest Shia Muslim (Twelver) population in the world.

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S. Jack Heffernan Ph.D. Funds Manager at HEFFX holds a Ph.D. in Economics and brings with him over 25 years of trading experience in Asia and hands on experience in Venture Capital, he has been involved in several start ups that have seen market capitalization over $500m and 1 that reach a peak market cap of $15b. He has managed and overseen start ups in Mining, Shipping, Technology and Financial Services.

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