World War 3: Fears Mount

World War 3: Fears Mount

World War 3: Fears Mount

World War 3 Tensions have been rising on the Korean Peninsula since President Trump adopted a much harder line on Pyongyang than his predecessor, Barack Obama. The White House has repeatedly called on North Korea to abandon its nuclear and missile programs. The latest flare-up in rhetoric was triggered by reports that the North was about to conduct its sixth nuclear test or fire a nuclear-capable ballistic missile.

In April, Trump dispatched the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson along with a “very powerful armada” to the Korean Peninsula for joint drills with the Japanese and South Korean militaries, as well as deploying the THAAD anti-missile system in South Korea, a decision that has been criticized by the Russian and Chinese governments.

North Korea has rejected all sanctions imposed against it since it conducted its first nuclear test in 2006, claiming such measures encroach on its sovereignty and right to self-defense.

The North Korean government denounced these latest sanctions as “a crafty hostile act with the purpose of putting a curb on the DPRK’s [Democratic People’s Republic of Korea] buildup of nuclear forces, disarming it and causing economic suffocation to it,” Reuters quoted the foreign ministry spokesman as saying on Sunday, in a statement carried by the official KCNA news agency.

Japan Holds Evacuation Drill Amid Tension From N. Korea
Japan Holds Evacuation Drill Amid Tension From N. Korea

“Whatever sanctions and pressure may follow, we will not flinch from the road to build up nuclear forces which was chosen to defend the sovereignty of the country and the rights to national existence and will move forward towards the final victory,” the spokesman added.

These latest sanctions had the agreement of both the United States and China, the latter being North Korea’s only notable ally. In April, US President Donald Trump said that he was working with his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, to resolve the “North Korean problem.” In April, Beijing halted imports of coal shipments from North Korea, one of the isolated country’s few sources of income, but has taken a less confrontational approach than Washington with calls for more dialogue.

North Korea accuses China and the US of “railroading and enforcing” the latest round of sanctions “after having drafted it in the backroom at their own pleasure.”

“It is a fatal miscalculation if the countries… even think that they can delay or hold in check the eye-opening development of the (DPRK’s) nuclear forces even for a moment,” the DPRK spokesman said.

The State Department urged North Korea on Sunday to stop destabilizing actions and World War 3 rhetoric, and return to talks after Pyongyang rejected a U.N. Security Council sanctions resolution and vowed to further enlarge its nuclear arsenal.

The North’s Foreign Ministry made the statement earlier Sunday, calling the Security Council resolution “a crafty hostile act with the purpose of putting a curb on the DPRK’s buildup of nuclear forces, disarming it and causing economic suffocation to it.”

It also said the country “will not flinch from the road to build up nuclear forces” and vowed to continue to carry out ballistic missile launches “until the moment when the U.S. and its followers are brought to reason about the root cause and a solution to the nuclear issue.” This is a move set to ignite World War 3.

“We call on North Korea to refrain from provocative, destabilizing actions and rhetoric, and to make the strategic choice to fulfill its international obligations and commitments and return to serious talks,” State Department spokeswoman Anna Richey-Allen told Yonhap News Agency.

The Security Council adopted Resolution 2356 on Friday, blacklisting four additional North Korean officials and 14 entities, after Pyongyang carried out a series of successful missile tests that demonstrated steady progress in its pursuit of a nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching the U.S.

It was the seventh resolution the Security Council has adopted to impose sanctions on North Korea over its nuclear and missile programs since its first nuclear test in 2006. The new resolution came six months after the previous resolution was adopted in November to punish the North’s fifth nuclear test in September.

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S. Jack Heffernan Ph.D. Funds Manager at HEFFX holds a Ph.D. in Economics and brings with him over 25 years of trading experience in Asia and hands on experience in Venture Capital, he has been involved in several start ups that have seen market capitalization over $500m and 1 that reach a peak market cap of $15b. He has managed and overseen start ups in Mining, Shipping, Technology and Financial Services.

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