US Vs Diabetes

US Vs Diabetes

US adults with diabetes are no more likely to meet disease control targets than they were in Y 2005, a new study finds.

Typically, diabetes treatment focuses on controlling blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels, as well as no smoking.

For the study, Massachusetts General Hospital researchers analyzed data on diabetes care in the United States from Ys 2005 through 2016. The investigators found that one in 4 adults with diabetes was not diagnosed, and nearly one in 3 was not receiving appropriate care for diabetes.

Fewer than 1 in 4 American adults with diagnosed diabetes achieve a controlled level of blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol and do not smoke tobacco,” said study lead author Pooyan Kazemian, of the hospital’s Medical Practice Evaluation Center.

Our results suggest that, despite major advances in diabetes drug discovery and movement to develop innovative care delivery models over the past two decades, achievement of diabetes care targets has not improved in the United States since 2005,” Kazemian said in a hospital news release I read Monday.

More than 30-M Americans have diabetes. Most have type 2, which is linked to lifestyle.

Certain groups of patients were less likely to achieve diabetes care targets, according to the study.

“Younger age (18-44), female and nonwhite adults with diabetes had lower odds of achieving the composite blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol and nonsmoking target,” Kazemian said.

Patients with insurance coverage were most likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes and to have achieved treatment targets, the researchers noted.

According to study senior author Dr. Deborah Wexler, “Barriers accessing health care, including lack of health insurance and high drug costs, remain major factors that have not been adequately addressed on a population level.” Dr. Wexler is with the hospital’s diabetes unit and is an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Treatment advances in diabetes mellitus can meaningfully improve outcomes only if they effectively reach the populations at risk. Our findings suggest this is not the case in the US,” Dr. Wexler said.

The findings, she added, indicate an immediate need for better approaches to diabetes care delivery, “including a continued focus on reaching underserved populations with persistent disparities in care.”

The study was published recently in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live Lively

The following two tabs change content below.

Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

Latest posts by Paul Ebeling (see all)

You must be logged in to post comments :  
CONNECT WITH