US Moving Military Forces and Equipment to the Southern Border

US Moving Military Forces and Equipment to the Southern Border

US Moving Military Forces and Equipment to the Southern Border

US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says the military has already begun delivering jersey barriers to the southern border in conjunction with plans to deploy active duty troops there as a caravan of Central Americans walks across Mexico toward the United States.

Secretary Mattis says details of the deployment, including the number of troops, are still being worked out, but he should have them by Sunday night.

The additional troops will provide logistical and other support to the Border Patrol and will bolster the efforts of the approximately 2,000 National Guard forces already there. The new forces are expected to provide logistical assistance such as air support and equipment, such as vehicles and tents.

Coordinators of an invading caravan of several thousand Central American migrants moving through southern Mexico urged its members to rest Sunday. At 1st the migrants vowed to press on anyway but later changed their minds amid reports that a child had been abducted.

The migrants said they would stay and hold a meeting Sunday in Tapanatepec.

Late Saturday night, groups of migrants were running through the town’s streets saying a migrant’s child had been snatched. Something similar led to a panic at an earlier stop, but not confirmed.

After being delayed for a couple hours when federal police halted their exit from the town of Arriaga Saturday morning, most of the migrants arrived in Tapanatepec in the searing heat. Dozens headed down to the Novillero river below the central square to bathe, wash clothing and cool off.

Others lined up at a medical aid station mostly for attention to their battered feet.

For the 1st time an arm of the federal government seemed to be directly helping the migrants advance rather than trying to diminish the caravan.

In this case Grupo Beta, Mexico’s migrant protection agency, gave rides to stragglers and passed out water.

The caravan still must travel 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) to reach the nearest US border crossing at McAllen, Texas. The trip could be twice as long if the 4,000 or so migrants head for the Tijuana-San Diego frontier, as another caravan did earlier this year. Only about 200 in that group made it to the border.

Most of the migrants in the caravan appeared determined to reach the U.S., despite an offer of refuge in Mexico.

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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