Travel Etiquette: What We All Should Know and Practice

Travel Etiquette: What We All Should Know and Practice

Travel Etiquette: What We All Should Know and Practice

Travel is a super experience, but there is an unwritten set of rules governing the travelers behavior. From the expectations of other tourists to ingrained traditions and customs of the country or region we are visiting, and we do not want to offend.

To avoid making a faux pas that ruins at trip, read these travel etiquette tips, they can help make the trip easier and happier

As a guest mindfulness is Key

In Japan, it’s perfectly acceptable to slurp noodles and in China, it’s normal to burp after a meal. So, when the guest fit in.

Do not talk politics

Whether BREXIT in Britain or President Trump in the US, it’s never a good idea to express an opinion about politics in a country that is not your own. So, be safe and confine yourself to the role of interested listener. Of course, if asked your opinion it may be safe to engage in conversation, but remember to be courteous, and respectful of others’ passions.

Hold off on the local slang

In an effort to fit in, we ar tempted to adopt local slang. But while raising your glass and saying “Cheers” in a London pub is absolutely fine, calling everyone “me ol’ china” is not. Unless you want to be accused of mockery or treated with derision, it’s best to avoid Cockney rhyming slang or its equivalent.

Note: Blindly adopting slang is different from making a conscious effort to learn the language. But still, until you understand the culture and people, hold off on the slang terms.

Bargain, but not too hard

In souks of Marrakesh or the markets of Guatemala and if you pay full price, you will be laughed at. But, haggling too hard and you risk missing out. Bargain a little, but never so much that your sale is going to cause the seller harm.

Pay attention to what’s going on around you

Spoiling someone’s photograph to get your own is just not acceptable. So, pay attention to what’s going on around you. Ride the Metro at rush hour by all means, but move over on an escalator if you’re blocking someone’s way.

Note: You are on holiday but locals have to get to work, so do not make their commute a living hell. Respecting other people’s space is also important on planes, trains and buses.

Act and dress appropriately

Most people know that you need to cover your head, shoulders, knees and even ankles when going into many religious places and buildings, but in the country of Georgia, women are not allowed to enter if they are wearing long pants.

Pointing the soles of your bare feet at someone in Thailand is insulting, as is patting someone on the head.

Hand gestures are also verboten.

The thumbs up sign that will win you fans across Europe could well get you arrested in Iran, while the “I’m fine” signal used by divers everywhere is off the table in Brazil as another meaning.

Read up, do your homework before you head out on that travel adventure.

It is all about respect, respect others and enjoy this beautiful world; that what travel is about.

The following two tabs change content below.

Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

You must be logged in to post comments :  
CONNECT WITH