Some Tips on How to Become the Best at What You Do

Some Tips on How to Become the Best at What You Do

Some Tips on How to Become the Best at What You Do

1. Work On Yourself, Not On Your Job

Your work is a reflection of you. If you are not getting the results you’re looking for, stop looking for better strategies.

Instead, look inside.

Are you currently the person who would attract the level of success you seek?

Your outer conditions are a reflection of your inner reality.

Where you are right now: that is you.

If you want something different: improve you.

Most people focus on their craft or their job. That is good. However, you will get far more by focusing on yourself.

20% of your energy should be devoted to your work.

80% of your energy should be devoted to rest and self-improvement.

This is what fuels your work and makes it better than anyone else’s. Self-improvement is more than books and true rest is renewal.

While others are trying to improve their job, you’re continuously improving yourself, expanding your vision, skills, and abilities.

“Give me 6 hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the 1st 4 sharpening the axe.” — Abraham Lincoln

Within a short period of time, you’ll have developed true mastery. Everyone else is trying to hone their “craft.”

Do not work on your job. Work on yourself.

When you do, your work will far exceed what other people are painstakingly producing. Your work will be cleaner, clearer, and more powerful because you’ll be more evolved as a person.

Most people you’re “competing” against are a mess inside.

2. Consistently Put Yourself Into Situations Others Can Only Dream Of

“Necessity is the mother of invention.” — English Proverb

Your results are not a reflection of your talent. Lots of people have talent. Few people, however, are required to rise to a difficult challenge.

Most people never put themselves in demanding situations , situations that humble and scare you.

You need to put yourself into positions that create immense pressure.

The kind of pressure that will either make or break you. This is how you purge out your weakness and small-mindedness. It will not be pretty. But it will change you.

Eventually, you will rise up, new, changed, and better.

You need to be taking on challenges that require you to become so much more than you currently are. You need to put your back against the wall so you have no other choice but to produce.

This is how you evolve.

How do you put yourself into these situations?

You initiate. You do not wait for life to come to you. You do not wait for the “next” opportunity.

You improve your current situation or “job” by providing actual value. You pitch ideas. You ask questions. You try and fail. You take on roles that require greater responsibility.

“Leadership” is available to everyone.

You just need to assume a leadership roleYou can do that right now, in whatever situation you’re in. You do this enough, and continuously pitch yourself and your ideas, you will create opportunities. You then maximize those opportunities and more will come.

Opportunities are like ideas. The more you use them, rather than let them simmer, the more will come. Most people sit on their ideas far too long and they become stale.

Also, most people sit on their opportunities too long and they stop coming.

3. Don’t Copy Other People. Make Them Copy You.

From this point, your strategy is to make everyone else get on your level, you’re not going down to theirs. You are not competing with anyone else, ever again. Theyare going to have to compete with you.

If you are still mimicking the work of other people, Good Luck.

If you’re trying to replicate the work and results of other people, what does that say about your own inner compass?

What does that say about your motivations?

Are you just trying to find what’s working?

Are you looking for the “how”?

Do you actually know where you’re going?

If you are following someone else’s tracks, where do you think those tracks will lead you, to your destination or to theirs?

And even if you would be happy with their destination, do you really think you could do it better than them?

It is their pathThey are driven by something deep and internal. You cannot get ahead if you are always a few steps behind. Or if you are always reacting rather than creating.

If you do not know who you are, you will always try to be someone else. Thus, you will never be the best. Your work will always be an imitation. It will lack the feeling that produced the work or the idea.

4. Stay In Love With The Process

“The more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war.” — General of the Army Norman Schwarzkopf

The process  is all there is. Results come and go, and it has never been about the results. Success is inevitable.

Success comes easy because it is the last thing on your mind, as you already know it’s going to happen.

The work itself  is what drives you. It almost doesn’t matter what you are doing. It is why you’re doing it that matters.

The “what” can and does take many forms.

Do not over-attach to one role.

Whether you are a leader, writer, athlete, parent, employee, the what doesn’t matter. Why you do it and subsequently how you do it is what matters.

Hence, how you do anything is how you do everything.

When you are in love with the process, you seek feedback, mentoring, and coaching ,  even when you are at the Top of your game.

You surround yourself with people who are not afraid to tell you the truth. You avoid people who suck-up and only tell you what they think you want to hear. Those are not friends, they have an agenda.

Self-transcendence comes from collaborating with others who are driven by a greater and grander vision. When the whole becomes fundamentally different than the sum of its parts. When the work is the reward.

Go beyond anything you have ever imagined, be open to the possibilities. Unless you are continuously improving and working with better people, you will never realize this.

When you hone yourself, your work, and you produce , the opportunities come.

5. Never Forget Why You’re Doing This

“So many times it happens too fast. You trade your passion for glory. Do not lose your grip on the dreams of the past. You must fight just to keep them alive”Survivor, Eye of the Tiger

It blows me away how often I see people throw their value-systems out the door in hopes for quick success.

When I see this happen, I already know these people will not succeed long-term, as they clearly do not have a Why, they do not have that inner compass.

Consequently, they do not really know where they are headed, as it is a path to nowhere.

The moment you start compromising, you will not stop compromising.

Clayton Christensen said: “Many of us have convinced ourselves that we are able to break our own personal rules “just this once.” In our minds, we can justify these small choices. None of those things, when they first happen, feels like a life-changing decision. The marginal costs are almost always low. But each of those decisions can roll up into a much bigger picture, turning you into the kind of person you never wanted to be.”

This is more common than not.

In fact, it is so common that it is in most cased expected. Hence, few people become the best at what they do, they become something far less.

Becoming the best is about never being satisfied with what you’ve done. It is about continually improving who you are.

It is knowing success will come because you know who you are and what you stand for.

It’s about initiating , and continually creating situations that force you to become more than you currently are.

Purge yourself of imperfections, evolve.

When you are confident about what you do and clear about where you are going, the right strategy will make itself known.

When your Why is strong, you will figure out the How, as the How comes from the Why.

This is your journey, begin, make it happen.

From Confucius, burn these 3 precepts into you Cerebral Cortex

1. Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

 2. It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop.

 3. I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

And always eat Real food.

 

 

 

 

 

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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