The Cream in Your Coffee and Tea

The Cream in Your Coffee and Tea

When Cream hits the Coffee the results are magical, here is why.

Coffee is one of the most popular beverages in the world. Statistics show that more than 50% the US population drink coffee on a daily basis. Further, those individuals drink 3.1 cups of ‘Java’ every 1 day.

In the last several years, coffee has been identified, as has tea as a healthy beverage if consumed in optimal amounts.

Coffee drinking is associated with reduced risk of an early death and heart-related illnesses, cancer, diabetes, cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

Tea has been linked to reduced risks of stroke, diabetes and depression, as well as improved blood pressure, lower rates of obesity and moderated glucose levels.

Adding cream to coffee and for some, to tea changes everything, and for more than just taste.

It has to do with the temperatures, but it has become a great debate over decades and even centuries. Scientists were reportedly fascinated with a slow-motion video of a drop of milk being dropped into a cup of hot coffee, because for a few nano-secs, the cream floated.

The featured video above notes that when you mix 2 blendable liquids, they usually combine immediately. But when there is that brief delay before it sinks, the base of the milk heats a tiny amount, but enough for the surface area of coffee directly under it to cool.

“Molecules in both the milk and coffee begin moving in a circular direction, which guides the airflow around the bottom of the drop, creating enough pressure to ‘levitate’ the drop. Researchers say you could theoretically levitate a drop of milk forever, as long as the coffee stays hot, and the milk stays cold.

John Bush, a professor of Applied Mathematics at MIT, says if it were possible to maintain the temperature difference, the cream could be “levitated” indefinitely, and that while it might be easier to put a hot drop on a cold bath, it would work if you could add some sort of heating element to the inside of the drop.

The important part of the discussion, the video explains, is that the discovery goes far beyond coffee or tea and milk, because keeping liquids separate is Key in other arenas, such as inkjet printing and DNA testing.

In fact, scientists say it could influence the way technology is advanced, and improve scientists’ understanding of how droplets behave in nature.

Be sure to use Real Cream, Half & Half or Whole Milk. No artificial creamers please.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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