Some of the Greatest Ferrari Race Cars Ever on the Lawn at Pebble Beach

Some of the Greatest Ferrari Race Cars Ever on the Lawn at Pebble Beach

$RACE

A sea of Ferrari Red racing machines honored Scuderia Ferrari’s 90th anni

Ferrari (NYSE:RACE) as a brand just celebrated its 70th anni in Maranello, Italy, 2 years ago. But long before Enzo Ferrari founded Ferrari, he was a race driver himself, then later the manager of Alfa Romeo Grand Prix racing activities, and Y 2019 is thus Scuderia Ferrari’s 90th anni.

Ferrari felt a celebration was in order, and At the 2019 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, some competition Ferraris were assembled on the golf course’s 1st fairway.

Here are some photos of the competition Ferraris that were on the Lawn last weekend at Pebble Beach.

1999 Ferrari 333 SP

Ferrari re-entered sports car racing in 1994 after a 20-year hiatus with the 333 SP. Jointly developed and built by Ferrari and Dallara originally, the 333 SP was earmarked for the World Sports Car championship and it had success in the IMSA GT championship as well, winning the 1995 and 1997 12 Hours of Sebring. Powered by a 4.0-liter version of the V-12 that was used in the Ferrari 641 Formula 1 car, output was somewhere around 650 horsepower and the engine was said to be quite reliable, as far as race engines go. This car is chassis 027 was originally bought by an Austrian collector and used at noncompetitive track days. It is a late example, built to incorporate several upgrades at a time when the car was aging and losing its competitiveness.

1948 Ferrari 166 Spyder Corsa

The 166 Spyder Corsa, Ferrari’s official signage incorrectly referred to the car as an Inter Sport-Corsa, was a cycle-fendered, open-top racer that was essentially the 2nd generation of the 1st Ferrari model produced, the 125S. This car, chassis 04C, was likely the 4th Spyder Corsa built and 1 of only 2 remaining with its original bodywork. The 125S V-12 engine was enlarged to 2.0 liters for the 166 and this car was raced by the current owner’s father into the 1950’s.

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/C

This ex-Scuderia Filipinetti 275 GTB/C is a competition car based on the 275 GTB grand-touring street car. To make the switch from street to track, Ferrari’s competition department skinned this 275 and 11 more like it in lightweight aluminum, fitted a Tipo 213 race engine, a 3.2-liter V-12 making about 320 horsepower at 7,500 rpm, and set about to win some GT-class races. The famed Scuderia Filipinetti team was the 1st to make use of the car, bringing it to Le Mans in Y 1967 where it finished 11th overall, ahead of the team’s own Ford GT40 and a Ferrari 412 P both prototype class cars.

1971 Ferrari 512 M

If you have seen Steve McQueen’s epic racing classic film Le Mans is familiar with the Ferrari 512 M as the antagonist to the leading Porsche 917 race car driven by Mr. McQueen. This car began life as a 1970 512 S, an all-new prototype race car that Ferrari built to go head to head with said Porsches. When the car went unused in the Y 1970 season, the factory converted it to new 512 S spec, with revised bodywork and reliability improvements. It was sold to famed Ferrari importer Luigi Chinetti’s North American Racing Team (N.A.R.T.) in Y 1971 as Ferrari handed its 512 racing efforts off to privateer team. It finished 3rd overall at Le Mans in the same year.

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Competizione

Like the 275 GTB/C above, the 365 GTB/4 Competizione was built 1st as a street car, then made into a race car with aluminum bodywork and a higher-output engine. There were 3 series of cars were built, this 1 being a later 3rd series, and the progression from 1st to 3rd indicated fewer alloy body panels in exchange for wider wheels and fender flares. This car was originally raced by N.A.R.T in the ’73 Daytona and ’74 Le Mans events, crashing out at both. In Y 1975, it raced under the Interscope banner and won its class at Daytona while also finishing an impressive seventh overall.

1986 Ferrari 288 GTO Evoluzione

The 288 GTO Evoluzione is a bridge between the GTO and the later Ferrari F40. Built as a Group B race car before the class was canceled over safety concerns, the Evoluzione uses a twin-turbocharged version of the GTO’s 2.9-liter V-8; wider, lighter, downforce-inducing bodywork; and larger wheels and brakes. Just six were built and the visual cues to the later F40 production car are readily apparent.

1992 Ferrari 348 Challenge

The Ferrari 348 Challenge series was the brand’s 1st attempt at a “gentleman driver” spec-racing series, aimed at wealthy amateur racers. Races were held only in Europe at 1st, and the car itself was a lightly modified 348 TB street car with 20 more horsepower (320 total), a less restrictive exhaust system, modified air intakes, beefier brakes to combat fade, and of course sticky race tires, a roll cage, and a full complement of safety gear. The series ran until Y 1995 when it was replaced by the F355 Challenge, based on the 348’s successor. This car was built as a promotional vehicle and was retained by Ferrari until Y 1997. Most recently, it was sold at auction in Maranello for the brand’s 70th Anniversary celebration.

1996 Ferrari F50 GT

A racing variant on the limited-production F50 street car, the F50 GT was designed to compete in the GT1 racing class, against such competitors as the McLaren F1 GTR and Jaguar XJ220. Unfortunately, the race class’s organizing body changed for the following season and Ferrari was unhappy with the new regulations, which would allow vastly more competitive cars in the series. As a result, just 3 F50 GTs were ever built, this car s/n 001, the initial testing and development example.

1997 Ferrari F310-B

An evolution of the earlier F310, this F310-B was Ferrari’s 1st F1 car designed with input from new engineer Rory Byrne, who would go on to design 6 world-championship-winning F1 cars for The Scuderia. While Jacques Villeneuve would clinch the 1997 F1 World Championship in the final round in a Williams-Renault, Ferrari’s new star driver Michael Schumacher would win 5 races that year, a sign of things to come. This car, chassis #0179, was the second-to-last F310-B built with lighter weight and a larger fuel cell. It boasts a mid-mounted 730-hp, 3.0-liter V-10 engine. Mr. Schumacher drove the car for 1 race, preferring the dynamics of the previous cars, and teammate Eddie Irvine commandeered #0179 for 2 more races with disappointing results.

Ferrari is the Aristocrat of the automotive sector.

Enzo Ferrari’s iconic Italian Supercar manufacturer claimed the title according to the latest Brand Finance Global 500 2019 report launched at the World Economic Forum in Davos.

HeffX-LTN overall technical outlook for RACE is Neutral to Bullish, overhead resistance is at 156.75, and support at 153.32, all Key indicators are flashing Neutral to Bearish in here. Ferrari finished at 155.11, -1.38 Thursday in NY.

Note: Goldman Sachs upgraded Ferrari to ‘buy‘ from ‘neutral ‘calling the stock’s pullback a good “entry point.” “We upgrade Ferrari from Neutral to Buy, offering 15% upside to our new price targets of 182. Our thesis, outlined in Life of Luxury published last month, is fundamentally unchanged post Ferrari’s in-line 2-Q results. We view the stock’s recent pullback (-7.5% since July 16) as a good entry point in here.

Ferrari will continue to create value in the long term. Ferrari is a quality 1st long term investment, and I see it at 200/share in that frame.

Stay tuned…

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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