Social Media Can Increase Loneliness

Social Media Can Increase Loneliness

Social Media Can Increase Loneliness

For the billions of young people who seek community and connection on social media, new research warns their search may be in vain.

Instead, spending too much time on Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram may actually increase the risk of depression and loneliness.

So concludes a small analysis that tracked the impact such sites had on the mental health of 143 users between the ages of 18 and 22.

Over the course of a week, some participants were told to use the sites as often as they normally would, which typically came to about an hour a day. Others were asked to limit their usage to just 10 minutes a day per site, amounting to a total of about 25 mins per day.

The Big Q: The result?

The Big A: “Ours is the 1st study to establish that reducing social media use actually causes reductions in depression,” said study author Melissa Hunt. She is the associate director of clinical training in the department of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.

“The main finding of the paper is that limiting your use of Facebook, Snapchat and Instagram to 30 mins total or less per day results in reductions in depression and loneliness, especially for people who were moderately depressed to start with,” Ms. Hunt said.

“Our study cannot speak directly to why this happens,” she stressed. “But prior research strongly suggests that negative social comparison like my life is worse than other people’s lives, and feeling left out of activities and experiences shared by others probably explains a lot of it.”

The study team noted that 78% of Americans aged 18 to 24 use Snapchat, while more than 7 in 10 young adults use Instagram.

Meanwhile, nearly as many American adults have a Facebook account (68%), and 75% of those say they use it every day.

All of the participants were UPenn undergraduates (108 women and 35 men) enrolled in psychology courses. All had an iPhone already loaded with all 3 site apps.

Participants first completed a pre-experiment survey to assess their feelings of anxiety, depression, loneliness, FOMO (fear of missing out), sense of social support, sense of self-esteem, and perceptions regarding self-acceptance and autonomy.

After tracking each participant’s normal use of all 3 sites for a week, the team observed that, for the most part, those struggling with greater mental “distress” did not typically spend more time on social media.

However, those who struggled with FOMO were the exception; they did tend to spend more time using social media.

The study participants were then randomly assigned to either unlimited or restricted access for a second week, after which mental health was re-assessed.

The results suggested that restricting social media use had a “significant” and beneficial impact by reducing depressive symptoms, especially among those who had been moderately or highly depressed. Time restrictions also reduced feelings of loneliness.

But the restrictions had no impact on feelings of social support, self-esteem or one’s overall sense of well-being. Whether the findings would also apply to older users remains an open question, the study authors noted.

While not advocating for a total divorce from all social media, the team acknowledged that identifying the perfect sweet spot for ideal usage habits remains elusive.

The findings will be published in the December issue of the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

Dr. Brian Primack is director of the Center for Research on Media, Technology and Health at the University of Pittsburgh.

He described the findings as “important,” noting that “because of its experimental design, this study goes an important step further [than prior research] in showing that actively reducing social media use can be helpful.”

Dr. Primack added that linking a clear mental health benefit to 30 mins of usage per day is a helpful marker.

“However, it is important to note that all social media use is not the same,” said Primack. “30 mins of use may be spent connecting with loved ones, or it may focus instead on having aggressive interactions about hot-button issues. So, future research might expand findings like this by exploring different contexts of social media use.”

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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