Saudi Arabia and Iran in Deadly War of Words

Saudi Arabia and Iran in Deadly War of Words

Saudi Arabia and Iran in Deadly War of Words

Iran has blamed Saudi Arabia for the terrorist attack in Tehran. The 2 nations are already at war in Yemen but the recent move on Qatar has many thinking that Saudi Arabia is preparing for all out war with Iran.

Earlier, Brigadier General Hossein Salami, IRGC deputy commander, said that Iran will “take revenge” for the attacks.

“Let there be no doubt that we will take revenge for today’s attacks in Tehran, on terrorists, their affiliates and their supporters,” he said, as cited by the news agency Mehr.

Twelve people were reported killed and 43 injured in gun and bomb attacks in the Iranian capital. The perpetrators targeted the Iranian parliament and Ayatollah Khomeini’s shrine.

Both attacks were claimed by Islamic State (IS, formerly ISIS/ISIL), the jihadist organization based in Iraq and Syria. Iran supports both countries in their fight against IS.

IS also threatened Iran’s majority Shiite population with more attacks, saying “the caliphate will not miss a chance to spill their blood” until Sharia law is implemented, Reuters reported.

The attacks in Tehran were the first that IS had claimed responsibility for in the Shiite Islamic republic.

The timing of the attacks, shortly after a presidential election in Iran, may indicate that the perpetrators want to cast doubt on the decision of the Iranian people to give President Hassan Rouhani a second term, Middle East expert Catherine Shakdam told RT.

“Iran has just conducted quite successfully its presidential election. Everything went according to plan, it was peaceful, it was progressive,” she said.

“There is a clear desire to drive a narrative of fear and to make people have a sense of insecurity and doubt their officials and how they can protect their own borders.”

Iran’s Revolutionary Guards have accused Saudi Arabia of masterminding the deadly attacks in Tehran on Wednesday, a claim which Riyadh has denied.

“This terrorist attack happened only a week after the meeting between the U.S. president (Donald Trump) and the (Saudi) backward leaders who support terrorists. The fact that Islamic State has claimed responsibility proves that they were involved in the brutal attack,” said the statement, as quoted by Reuters.

Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister, Adel Al-Jubeir, has denied that Riyadh was involved in the attacks.

“We condemn terrorist attacks anywhere they occur and we condemn the killing of the innocent anywhere it occurs,” Jubeir said, as quoted by Reuters.

Saudi Arabia vs. Iran The Battle for Islam

This is the Battle for Islam

In Yemen, where the two-year Saudi bombing blitz has killed over 10,000 civilians, in Bahrain, where Saudi troops and tanks snuffed out dissent in the Shia-majority state, in Syria, where Saudis send weapons, cash and support to ISIS, Al-Qaeda and other head-chopping extremists. This Saudi hysteria has now touched every corner of the world, and by the $100+ billion Riyadh has invested in radical schools, mosques, and propaganda to indoctrinate an entire generation of Muslims in Wahhabi-style intolerance.

Sunni Islam and Shia Islam are the two major denominations of Islam. Their division traces back to a Sunni–Shia schism following the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad in the year 632. A dispute over succession to Muhammad as a caliph of the Islamic community spread across various parts of the world, which led to the Battle of Jamal and Battle of Siffin. The dispute intensified greatly after the Battle of Karbala, in which Hussein ibn Ali and his household were killed by the ruling Umayyad Caliph Yazid I, and the outcry for revenge divided the early Islamic community.

The present demographic breakdown between the two denominations is difficult to assess and varies by source, but a good approximation is that 85–90% of the world’s Muslims are Sunni and 10–15% are Shia, with most Shias belonging to the Twelver tradition and the rest divided between many other groups.Sunnis are a majority in most Muslim communities: in Southeast Asia, China, South Asia, Africa, and most of the Arab world. Shia make up the majority of the citizen population in Iraq, Bahrain, Lebanon, Iran and Azerbaijan, as well as being a politically significant minority in Pakistan, Syria and Yemen. Azerbaijan is predominantly Shia; however, practicing adherents are much fewer. Indonesia has the largest number of Sunni Muslims, while Iran has the largest number of Shia Muslims (Twelver) in the world. Pakistan has the second-largest Sunni. India has the second-largest Shia Muslim (Twelver) population in the world.

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S. Jack Heffernan Ph.D. Funds Manager at HEFFX holds a Ph.D. in Economics and brings with him over 25 years of trading experience in Asia and hands on experience in Venture Capital, he has been involved in several start ups that have seen market capitalization over $500m and 1 that reach a peak market cap of $15b. He has managed and overseen start ups in Mining, Shipping, Technology and Financial Services.

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