Protect Your Heart and Your Brain

Protect Your Heart and Your Brain

“It’s never too late to improve your brain health,” says Lainey Younkin, MS, RD, LDN, registered dietitian and founder of Lainey Younkin Nutrition.

These tips may help improve your physical health, your brain health, and your cognitive abilities, they are as follows.

Aim for 150 mins or more of aerobic exercise each week. If you have not been moving regularly, do not worry.

A study found sedentary older adults who participated in a new habit of walking regularly for one year showed significant improvements in memory performance that also related to growth of memory areas in the brain.

Aerobic exercise coupled with strength training at least 2X per week has been shown to improve heart health. “We now know that these activities in all likelihood also improve brain health.”

In addition to eating brain-boosting foods like blueberries, nuts, and fatty fish, cut back on frozen meals, fast food, take out, deli meat, and cheese, which are some of the highest sources of sodium in the American diet that can drive up blood pressure,” Ms. Younkin said.

She added that there are clear guidelines for how to approach each meal, they are:

Aim to make half your plate non-starchy vegetables and a quarter of your plate whole grains,” she said. “The increase in fiber and decrease in ‘empty’ carbohydrates will help you maintain a healthy weight and keep your blood sugar stable.”

Anxiety and stress take a toll on our mental health, but they can also impact your physical and brain health, too. Regular meditation or a mindfulness practice may help reduce the risk of worsening vascular health.

Poor or inadequate sleep is associatedTrusted Source with worsening health and vascular risk factors, including high blood pressure and weight gain.

Your brain needs those “off” hours to help clean up neurons and synapses and make memories. When you do not get quality sleep, your brain health and your physical health are significantly impacted.

Many of these vascular risk factors are preventable.

A healthy lifestyle can help you prevent risk factors like high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. If you already have one or more of these risk factors, you may be able to make lifestyle changes that can reverse the conditions and help improve your brain health.

Check your blood pressure regularly, or at least every 6 months. Watch for signs of a creeping increase.

Research connecting poor physical health with deteriorating brain health is increasing. This study finds that vascular risk factors can damage your brain’s health, which could slow thinking skills and even lead to changes that resemble Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

This study has a strong public health message, Patients can help themselves.

A healthy lifestyle can help you prevent risk factors like high blood pressure, diabetes, and obesity. If you already have one or more of these risk factors, you may be able to make lifestyle changes that can reverse the conditions and help improve your brain health.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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