Music Trained Children Do Better in Life

Music Trained Children Do Better in Life

#music #children #think #memory #brain

Learning to play a musical instrument helps fine-tune childrens’ brains, researchers say.

In a new study, 40 children, 10 to 13 anni, performed memory and attention tasks while their brain activity was monitored with functional MRI. This type of imaging scan detects small changes in blood flow within the brain.

One set of 20 children played an instrument, had completed at least 2 yrs of lessons, practiced at least 2 hrs a wk, and regularly played in an orchestra or ensemble.

The other 20 children had no musical training other than in the school curriculum.

The 2 groups had no differences in reaction time. But the musically trained children did better on the memory task, according to the report published on 8 October in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience.

And along with better memory recall, the musically trained children had more activation in brain regions associated with attention control and auditory encoding functions associated with improved reading.

And along with better memory recall, the musically trained children had more activation in brain regions associated with attention control and auditory encoding  functions associated with improved reading, higher resilience, greater creativity, and a better quality of life.

Our most important finding is that 2 different mechanisms seem to underlie the better performance of musically trained children in the attention and … memory task,” said team leader Leonie Kausel, a violinist and neuroscientist at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, in Santiago.

Music training may increase the functional activity of certain brain networks, Kausel explained in a journal news release.

The researchers’ next step is to dig into the mechanisms they found for improving attention and working memory. They also plan to study musical training with children and possibly to evaluate a musical training intervention for childrens with ADHD (attention-deficit/hyperactivity) disorder, Kausel said.

The Big Q: Do the findings mean it is a good idea to put your children in music classes?

The Big A: “Of course, I would recommend that,” Kausel said. “However, I think parents should not only enroll their children because they expect that this will help them boost their cognitive [mental] functions, but because it is also an activity that, even when very demanding, will provide them with joy and the possibility to learn a universal language.

Have a healthy day, Keep the Faith!

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, a polymath, excels, in diverse fields of knowledge Including Pattern Recognition Analysis in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange, and he it the author of "The Red Roadmaster's Technical Report on the US Major Market Indices, a highly regarded, weekly financial market commentary. He is a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to over a million cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognize Ebeling as an expert.