Medical Marijuana Update

Medical Marijuana Update

Medical Marijuana Update

A Maryland medical marijuana expansion bill aimed at addressing racial inequities is on the governor’s desk, there will be no joy in Tennessee this year, the Mormon Church opposes a Utah medical marijuana initiative, and more.

Maryland

On Monday, the legislature gave final approval to a medical marijuana expansion bill. The Senate Monday gave final approval to a bill that would increase the number of licenses for medical marijuana growers from 15 to 20 and the number of licenses for processors from 15 to 25 — largely in a bid to increase minority business ownership in the industry. None of the companies licensed so far has a black owner. House Bill 0002has already passed the House and goes now to the desk of Gov. Larry Hogan (R).

Pennsylvania

On Monday, Pennsylvania regulators recommended allowing the dry leaf and plant forms of medical marijuana. The advisory board voted to allow the use of “dry leaf or plant form for administration by vaporization.” The vote is only a recommendation; the final decision is up to state Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine. The vote was 11-0.

Tennessee

Last Wednesday, a medical marijuana bill died. The sponsor of a medical marijuana bill has pulled it, saying he didn’t have the support to move it in the Senate. Senate Bill 1710 sponsor Sen. Steve Dickerson (R-Nashville) was blunt: “Unfortunately, I do not have the votes.” A companion measure is still alive in the House, but there will be no medical marijuana in the Volunteer State this year.

Utah

On Tuesday, the Mormon Church came out against the medical marijuana initiative. The Church’s First Presidency issued a statement Tuesday opposing the medical marijuana initiative, which is still in the signature gathering phase: “We commend the Utah Medical Association for its statement of March 30, 2018, cautioning that the proposed Utah marijuana initiative would compromise the health and safety of Utah communities. We respect the wise counsel of the medical doctors of Utah,” the statement reads. “The public interest is best served when all new drugs designed to relieve suffering and illness, and the procedures by which they are made available to the public, undergo the scrutiny of medical scientists and official approval bodies.”

For extensive information about the medical marijuana debate, presented in a neutral format, visit MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org.

By Phillip Smith

Paul Ebeling, Editor

 

Permission to Reprint: This article is licensed under a modified Creative Commons Attribution license.
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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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