Life Extension, the Search for Immortality

Life Extension, the Search for Immortality

Life Extension, the Search for Immortality

  • About 25% of children born today are expected to live beyond 100 anni, and research shows the number of Centenarians in the US has been 2X’ing each 10 years since the 1950’s

The fascination with longevity is an enduring one and the search for “the Fountain of Youth” has a long history, from tracking down sacred, life-giving water sources in the days of antiquity to the invention of nanobots and stem cell research in the modern age.

I remember it like yesterday just after WWII on a family trip to South Florida visiting Ste. Augustine the home of Ponce de Leon’s fabled, Fountain of Youth where I drank the water.

Life extension, and the quest for immortality brings up a lot of questions.

The Big Qs: What makes us human, what is personal identity, do we have a soul, who should have access to life extending technologies, etc, etc, etc.

As it is now, death is a certainty for all.

But, hang on, we can slow the aging process, and we do not need to be wealthy or reckless doing it,

According to longevity researchers, the majority of Centenarians, 100 anni and over, do not feel their chronological age, most report feeling 20 years younger.

They also tend to have positive attitudes, optimism and a zest for life. So, having a positive outlook on life has been shown to be the most influential factor in longevity studies.

Some researchers believe optimism has a direct effect on human biological systems. While conventional medicine is reluctant to admit that ones emotional state has a major impact on overall health and longevity, a Y 2013 article in Scientific American discusses a number of interesting advancements in the emerging field of psychoneuroimmunology.

Researchers discovered that the human brain and immune system are actually wired together. Connections between the human nervous system and immune-related organs such as your thymus and bone marrow allow for cross-talk between the 2 systems.

Our immune cells also have receptors for neurotransmitters, which suggests they can be more or less directly influenced by them.

In interviews and surveys with Centenarians, the following themes always come when they are asked to explain why they’ve lived so long.

The list contains things most people have control over.

Keeping a positive attitude Eating real food
Managing stress Not smoking or drinking excessively
Living independently Strong family ties
Exercising using the basic activities like walking, biking, gardening, swimming A network of friends
Staying mentally active and always learning something new Faith/Spirituality

You will find articles on all of the above in the heath section here.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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