Increase Your Level of Pain Tolerance

Increase Your Level of Pain Tolerance

Increase Your Level of Pain Tolerance

Some people have a higher pain tolerance than others, do you wonder Why?

Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine have found 1 answer: mindfulness. And that is good news, because experts say you can increase your mindfulness and pain tolerance.

Lead author Fadel Zeidan, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurobiology and anatomy at Wake Forest, found that individuals who were innately and naturally more mindful had lower pain sensitivity. He and his team published their findings in the journal PAIN after analyzing data from a Y 2015 study that compared mindfulness meditation to a placebo analgesia.  The team also researched what areas of the brain were involved in the process of pain reduction.

“Mindfulness is related to being aware of the present moment without too much emotional reaction or judgment,” says Dr. Zeidan. “We now know that some people are more mindful than others, and those people seemingly feel less pain.”

In the Y 2015 study, 76 healthy volunteers who had never meditated were clinically measured for their level of mindfulness using what’s called the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory. Then, while undergoing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), they were administered painful heat stimulation.

The MRI revealed that people with higher levels of mindfulness showed less activity in the brain region referred to as the posterior cingulate cortex during the painful heat stimulation. People who reported higher pain levels had greater activity in this critical area of the brain.

“Now we have some new ammunition to target this brain region in the development of effective new pain therapies,” said Dr. Zeidan. “Based on our previous research, we know we can increase mindfulness through relatively short periods of mindfulness meditation training, so this may prove to be an effective way to provide pain relief for the millions of people suffering from chronic pain.”

Mindfulness can be described as “bringing one’s attention to the present experience on a moment-to-moment basis without judgement.” By focusing on the present, the brain lowers the volume on the circuits that amplify pain.

In fact, an article in Psychology Today stated that mindful meditation has been shown to reduce pain by 56%. According to the article’s author, Danny Penman, Ph.D., accomplished meditators can reduce it by 90%.

“Imaging studies show that mindfulness soothes the brain patterns underlying pain, and over time, these changes take root and alter the structure of the brain itself so that patients no longer feel the pain with the same intensity. Many say they barely feel it at all,” says Penman.

Hospital pain clinics now prescribe mindfulness meditation to help patients cope with the suffering arising from a wide variety of diseases such as cancer and the side effects of chemotherapy, heart disease, diabetes and arthritis. It’s also used for chronic back problems, migraines, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue irritable bowel syndrome and even multiple sclerosis, according to the authors.

“I used mindfulness to cope with the extreme pain of a paragliding accident,” he reveals. “I found mindfulness to be an extremely powerful pain killer and I’m convinced it also accelerated my healing.”

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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