Eggs and Heart Disease

Eggs and Heart Disease

The current controversy over consumption of eggs would push anyone over the edge. Because eggs are 1 of the richest sources of cholesterol and almost 100-M North American adults have high cholesterol, many experts warn that eating eggs can increase your risk of heart disease and heart attacks.

Although most of our cholesterol is made by the liver, eating cholesterol-rich foods can still raise blood cholesterol levels, says Dr. Gabe Mirkin, author of “The Healthy Heart Miracle.

Eggs are becoming more controversial, especially since the most recent medical literature is mixed on the benefits versus the hazards,” Dr. Stephen Sinatra MD, a board-certified cardiologist and author of “Heart Sense for Women,” told us. “I believe that when it comes to eggs, moderation is key and I see no problem if someone consumes 2-4 Organic or free-range eggs per week.

I do not endorse eating eggs every day,” he says, recalling the case he saw in the emergency room one Easter Sunday. “A man came in who had consumed almost a dozen hard-boiled eggs that morning and had horrific chest pain. He had suffered a massive heart attack just hours after eating the eggs. Was there a connection between the eggs and the heart attack? I strongly believe the events were connected.

Studies from Harvard Medical School that have followed hundreds of thousands of people over decades did not find higher rates of heart attacks, strokes, or other cardiovascular disease in people who ate 1 egg daily. In fact, one Harvard Study published in Y 2018 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that people who were free from heart disease and diabetes who routinely ate eggs had a lower risk of death from stroke and heart disease compared with those who did not eat eggs.

Jonny Bowden, PhD, aka “The Nutrition Myth Buster,” says that he thinks eggs, especially the yolk are a terrific food and a great way to start your day.

“The cholesterol in eggs has virtually no effect on the cholesterol in your blood,” he says. “The fat in the egg yolk is mostly monounsaturated fat, the same kind found in olive oil! Many of the nutrients that make eggs so incredibly healthy are found in the yolk. For example, lutein and zeaxanthin, two members of the carotenoid family, are essential for eye health and choline is important for brain health.

Egg white omelets were 1 of the most bone-headed nutritional ideas of the past century and thank the nutrition gods, they are finally cracking up. The whole egg, if it is from organically raised, cage-free chicken, is one of nature’s most perfect foods and the idiot idea of dumping the yolk is just that — idiotic.”

Dr. Bowden recommends poaching or boiling eggs for maximum health benefits.

Scrambled eggs like those in open buffets have been exposed too long to air and oxygen, which can damage the cholesterol,” he says.

Dr. Mirkin recommends that most of us should limit eggs to 3-4X a week but if your LDL is over 100 or if you already have heart problems or diabetes, severely restrict or eliminate eggs from your diet.

My easy, healthful breakfast is oatmeal flavored with nuts and fruit,” he says. “My wife, Diana, eats black beans, chick peas or other legumes for breakfast every day. You don’t need to limit yourself to traditional breakfast fare. Choose fresh fruits, whole grains like barley, brown rice, and quinoa and other anti-inflammatory foods.

My choice for daily breakfast is 2 poached eggs and a rasher of Applewood smoked bacon, real orange juice, no toast, no coffee.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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