Does Your Happiness Need a ‘Pick Me Up’

Does Your Happiness Need a ‘Pick Me Up’

Does Your Happiness Need a ‘Pick Me Up’

  • Gratitude  has many physical effects, including lowering blood sugar and blood pressure, improving cognition, reducing inflammation and pain, improving sleep quality and quantity, and improving heart health and immune function

Just 1 in 3 Americans reports being “very happy,” and 1 in 4 experience no life enjoyment at all.

That can be fixed, Small changes in perspective and behavior can add up over time, and practicing gratitude is at the Top of the list of strategies known to boost happiness and life satisfaction.

If your happiness could use a ‘pick me up’, commit to cultivating an attitude of gratitude every day.

Not only will it pave the way to life satisfaction, but research also confirms it benefits both sanity and physical health. Enhancing your health and well-being, then, may be as simple as taking the time each day to reflect on what you’re thankful for.

Relationships tend to play a big role in one’s perception of happiness, and research has demonstrated gratitude is the single best predictor of relationship satisfaction.

It also boosts one’s sense of pleasure in general.

This effect has been traced back to gratitude’s ability to stimulate your hypothalamus, a brain area involved in the regulation of stress, and ventral tegmental area, part of the brain’s “reward circuitry,” an area that produces pleasurable feelings.

Gratitude has also been shown to play a significant role in our ability to expand your social circle and make more friends.

According to the authors of this study: “This experiment … provided evidence that perceptions of interpersonal warmth (e.g., friendliness, thoughtfulness) serve as the mechanism via which gratitude expressions facilitate affiliation. Insofar as gratitude expressions signaled interpersonal warmth of the expresser, they prompted investment in the burgeoning social bond. As such, these findings provide the first empirical evidence regarding 1 of the 3 central premises of the find-remind-and-bind theory of gratitude in the context of novel relationships.”

The ability to feel gratitude for little everyday things can also boost your willpower, improve your impulse control and make you a more patient person, all of which allow you to make more sensible decisions, including decisions concerning your health and finances.

Notably, gratitude is associated with increased happiness via a neural link to generosity.

Gratitude is actually a form of generosity, because it involves offering or extending “something” to another person, even if it’s only a verbal affirmation of thanks. Generosity, in turn, is neutrally linked to happiness. In other words, your brain is actually wired to boost your happiness when you commit acts of generosity, even when no money is involved.

Considering its ability to boost happiness and social connectivity, it’s no surprise gratitude has been shown to combat depression. Experiments have demonstrated that getting in the habit of listing 3 things you’re grateful for each day results in considerable improvements in depression, sometimes in as little as 2 weeks.

There is even biochemical support for the anti-depressive effects of gratitude.

Gratitude actually triggers the release of antidepressant and mood-regulating chemicals such as serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine and oxytocin, while inhibiting the stress chemical cortisol. These neurochemical effects are also why gratitude has been linked to reduced stress. And another reason is because it improves emotional resiliency.

And 3rd, gratitude has been shown to improve work performance.

In one study, managers who expressed gratitude saw a 50% increase in the employees’ performance. Considering more than 50% of all American workers say they are frustrated at or by work, it is clear there is much room for improvement here, and gratitude could go a long way toward fostering a healthier work environment for all parties.

The emotion of gratitude also has myriad physical benefits, actually producing measurable effects on a number of bodily systems, and correlating positively with self-rated physical health in general.

Gratitude also has many physical effects, including lowering blood sugar and blood pressure, improving cognition, reducing inflammation and pain, improving sleep quality and quantity, and improving heart health and immune function

Grateful people are also more likely to engage in healthy activities and self-care, such as exercising regularly, eating Real food and getting regular medical wellness checks.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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