Ancient Aliens: Life on Saturn’s Moon Possible say NASA

Ancient Aliens: Life on Saturn’s Moon Possible say NASA

Ancient Aliens: Life on Saturn’s Moon Possible say NASA

New research from NASA indicates that Saturn’s moon Enceladus may support microbial life. Details of new findings about ocean worlds in our solar system are being announced live by the agency.

NASA scientists have detected hydrogen from hydrothermal vents in ice plumes from Saturn’s ocean-bearing moon Enceladus in conditions which they say could have led to the rise of life on Earth.

The discovery makes Enceladus the only place beyond Earth where scientists have found direct evidence of a possible energy source for life, according to the findings published in Science.

The revelations center around discoveries from the agency’s Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope.

Chris Glein, Cassini INMS team associate at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), said during the news conference that they believe the hydrogen is produced by a chemical reaction between warm water and rocks.

The team says the moon has the sources needed for life, but what needs to be established is if it has enough time to evolve life.

Enceladus (pronounced /ɛnˈsɛlədəs/) en-CELL-ə-dəs; is the sixth-largest moon of Saturn. It is about 500 kilometers (310 mi) in diameter, about a tenth of that of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. Enceladus is mostly covered by fresh, clean ice, making it one of the most reflective bodies of the solar system. Consequently, its surface temperature at noon only reaches −198 °C (−324 °F), far colder than a light-absorbing body would be. Despite its small size, Enceladus has a wide range of surface features, ranging from old, heavily cratered regions to young, tectonically deformed terrains that formed as recently as 100 million years ago.

Enceladus was discovered on August 28, 1789, by William Herschel, but little was known about it until the two Voyager spacecrafts, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, passed nearby in the early 1980s. In 2005, the Cassini spacecraft started multiple close flybys of Enceladus, revealing its surface and environment in greater detail. In particular, Cassini discovered water-rich plumes venting from the south polar region. Cryovolcanoes near the south pole shoot geyser-like jets of water vapor, other volatiles, and solid material, including sodium chloride crystals and ice particles, into space, totaling about 200 kilograms (440 lb) per second. Over 100 geysers have been identified. Some of the water vapor falls back as “snow”; the rest escapes, and supplies most of the material making up Saturn’s E ring. According to NASA scientists, the plumes are similar in composition to comets. In 2014, NASA reported that Cassini found evidence for a large south polar subsurface ocean of liquid water with a thickness of around 10 km (6 mi).

These geyser observations, along with the finding of escaping internal heat and very few (if any) impact craters in the south polar region, show that Enceladus is geologically active today. Like many other satellites in the extensive systems of the giant planets, Enceladus is trapped in an orbital resonance. Its resonance with Dione excites its orbital eccentricity, which is damped by tidal forces, tidally heating its interior, and possibly driving the geological activity.

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Shayne Heffernan Funds Manager at HEFFX holds a Ph.D. in Economics and brings with him over 25 years of trading experience in Asia and hands on experience in Venture Capital, he has been involved in several start ups that have seen market capitalization over $500m and 1 that reach a peak market cap of $15b. He has managed and overseen start ups in Mining, Shipping, Technology and Financial Services.

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