America’s 550,000+ Homeless and the Virus

The Big Q: Why is no 1 addressing the explosive “virus spreading” potential simmering in the homeless, drug addicted encampments choking every Democrat-controlled city in America?

Notably, the California Department of Public Health says that it does not see the homeless population as particular point of concern as of now.

Persons experiencing homelessness are not likely to have any particular risk for COVID-19 related to international travel or exposure to recent travelers,” the agency said Friday in a statement to the press.

But, the potential for an outbreak among the unsheltered and addicted population across America is starting to concern many public health officials as the coronavirus spreads.

People living outdoors often do so in close quarters and lack the ability to maintain basic hygiene, including precautions such as hand washing.

They also face danger from serious infection because of existing illnesses and/or frequent use of drugs or alcohol factors with the potential to make a case of COVID-19 more severe.

Some homeless people also move often, making them both hard to reach for treatment and potentially increasing the spread of the virus if they become carriers.

People living in crowded, unsanitary conditions are at increased risk for a variety of infectious diseases, and the unsheltered population along with other chronic medical conditions, if they contract the coronavirus are at risk for more serious medical complications including death.

So, with an unprecedented number of people living on the streets of America, and large encampments now common in urban areas, coronavirus creates a situation unlike that of prior outbreaks of communicable disease.

That has led to an uncertain scenario as the outbreak evolves and public health officials must deal with the  complexities of managing a pandemic in the middle of a homelessness crisis.

A researcher with the Georgetown Center for Global Health Science and Security who has worked with homeless people, said that if the coronavirus reaches homeless people, it would present a potentially fast-moving hazard both to those living in encampments and to outreach workers, nearby residents and health providers. And that puts all of them at risk.

A Key point of concern if the virus reaches homeless people is where patients could be isolated to stem a wider outbreak. And when it spreads to that population, how and where would they be quarantined?

Few doubt the overall vulnerability of homeless population.

Last year, in California there was an outbreak of typhus in the squalor near LA’s skid row. In other places, including San Diego, homeless residents have seen cases of hepatitis A, and homeless people in Santa Monica recently had a few cases of trench fever, which is transmitted by body lice.

Doctors say the country’s more than half-million homeless people are at risk, and many  cases it was illness that sent many of those living on the streets to the streets.

Some state and local governments offer support programs while others do what they can to chase the homeless to other locales. Experts debate how to measure the problem and whether the issue can even be resolved. Regardless of the many challenges, The Trump Administration must address homelessness in much the same way it addressed our nation’s rise to energy independence.” said Bruce WD Barren, Chairman, EMCO Hanover Group in a telephone interview Monday,

Have a healthy day.

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