Zika Update: Banned Toxin Naled Spaying In Miami Beach

Zika Update: Banned Toxin Naled Spaying In Miami Beach

Zika Update: Banned Toxin Naled Spayings In Miami Beach

In Miami-Dade County, Florida, the aerial spraying campaign against Zika-carrying mosquitoes has been referred to as a “blitz” that “could be one for the record books if the CDC records it as a success.” 

The area began spraying the insecticide Naled from low-flying planes on 4 August.

Concerned residents took to the streets in the Wynwood (Miami) area, as well, but it didn’t have much of an impact.

Naled is banned in the European Union (EU), and when residents in Puerto Rico found out the CDC was going to use the chemical against Zika-carrying mosquitoes there, the streets filled with protesters. Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla finally forced the CDC to take the shipments back.

While the CDC seems convinced that Zika is behind the microcephaly cases in Brazil … other organizations such as Médicos de Pueblos Fumigados (Physicians in the Crop-Sprayed Villages) of Argentina … has argued that an insect growth regulator similar to Altosid may be responsible for the microcephaly cases.

Many experts argued that aerial spraying against the Zika-carrying mosquito Aedes aegypti is futile, exposing the population to toxic chemicals for no good reason.

These tiny black and white striped mosquitoes have a very limited range of flight, and since it’s so difficult to catch them airborne, insecticidal sprays and foggers are mostly useless for controlling them.

Reporting on recent research, WebMD writes: “Female mosquitoes can transmit the Zika virus to their eggs and offspring, and this may make it harder to contain outbreaks, a new lab study suggests. Control programs that focus only on adult mosquitoes may not halt Zika’s spread, the researchers warned …

‘Spraying affects adults, but it does not usually kill the immature forms — the eggs and larvae,’ said [study co-author Dr. Robert] Tesh. As a result, ‘spraying will reduce transmission, but it may not eliminate the virus’ …”

CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden defended the use of aerial insecticide spraying in a recent article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) citing a non-peer-reviewed presentation by a New Orleans mosquito control board employee named Brendan Carter.

According to Dr. Carter, aerial disbursement of “ultra-low volumes of insecticide” reduced caged Aedes aegypti by more than 90 percent in a New Orleans field trial.

However, as reported by Kaiser Health News: “Carter earned his master’s degree in 2014 from the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine … Even so, other experts in mosquito-borne diseases were unconvinced when asked about Carter’s finding as described in Frieden’s commentary for JAMA.

‘I know of no published reports that support this figure,’ said Durland Fish, [Ph.D.] a Yale University professor emeritus of microbial diseases as well as a professor of forestry and environmental studies there.

Fish worked with public officials in Dominica in 2014 to counter chikungunya virus, another disease spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. ‘This is a domestic mosquito, meaning they live inside the house — in closets, under the bed, in the sink. Spraying outside won’t be very effective,’ he said.”

Many others agree with Dr. Fish’s conclusion, noting there is virtually no scientific evidence to support the use of aerial spraying to control Aedes mosquitoes.

Joseph Conlon, spokesman for the American Mosquito Control Association, is not on that list.

According to Mr. Conlon, the idea that aerial spraying against Aedes mosquitoes does not work is an outdated notion, since Naled can now be sprayed in a micro-fine mist, “capable of wafting into homes through screen doors and bathroom vents.”

The Big Q: What about the residents, including infants and pregnant women, inside those homes who then breathe in this super-fine mist?

This is Naled: Naled is an organophospate insecticide known to interfere with cholinesterase activity, an enzyme essential for the proper working of your nervous system. Organophosphates as a group are also linked with shortened pregnancies, lowered IQ and increased risk of attention deficit disorder (ADD).

According to the Extension Toxicology Network, “Naled is moderately to highly toxic by ingestion, inhalation and dermal adsorption. Vapors or fumes of Naled are corrosive to the mucous membranes lining the mouth, throat and lungs, and inhalation may cause severe irritation.”

It is also readily absorbed through your skin and should be immediately washed off if contact occurs. High temperatures and/or UV light enhances its toxicity an added concern when sprayed in hot and sunny areas like Florida.

Naled was also sprayed in Dorchester County, South Carolina, in the morning hours between 6:30a. and 8:30a EDT on 28 August 2016 with devastating consequences.

In one Summerville apiary, 46 hives totaling 2.5-M bees died that same morning. Many other beekeepers also claim massive losses.

Read More: US Beekeepers Fearful, Anti-Zika Toxin Killing Bees

Florida health officials are investigating 6 new suspected non-travel-related Zika cases all in Miami.

The latest figures bring to 70 the number of cases where local mosquitoes are believed to have caused the infections, as opposed to people who have acquired the virus by traveling outside the US to places where Zika is more common.

Considering the limited risks of Zika and the significant risks of aerial insecticides on critical pollinators like bees and human health, one wonders what is  really driving the decision process.

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In Florida, people are wondering whether Governor Rick Scott may have a personal stake in this chemical warfare.

On 23 June 2016, Gov. Scott allocated $26.2-M in state emergency funds to combat Zika. As it turns out, an undisclosed conflict of interest could potentially have influenced this generous release of funds.

According to Florida Bulldog: “… Rick Scott has an undisclosed financial interest in a Zika mosquito control company in which his wife, Florida First Lady Ann Scott, owns a multi-million dollar stake through a private investment firm she co-owns. The company is Mosquito Control Services LLC of Metairie, LA. According to its website,

MCS ‘is a fully-certified team of mosquito control experts — licensed throughout the Gulf Coast, including Louisiana, Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida’ … It is not known whether MCS, whose services include monitoring and aerial spraying, stands to benefit from Florida government funds … MCS did not respond to two requests for comment.”

In a recent Health Nut News article, the author pieces together a list of events and players suggesting the real reason for the Zika hype may be related to the fact that the primary chemical weapons against Zika, Naled and Malathion are both up for re-evaluation at the EPA under a special provision of the Endangered Species Act. If found to harm endangered species, they will be banned, so unless there’s sufficient political pressure to keep them on the market, that is.

The Clean Water Act stipulates you must have a NPDES permit in order to be “allowed” to discharge pollutants into US waters. Insecticides are a significant water pollutant, and mosquito control applications that result in water discharges must have an NPDES permit, which includes limits on the discharges and has certain monitoring and reporting requirements to ensure the chemical does not hurt water quality and human health.

Should Naled and/or Malathion be found harmful to endangered species, operators would not likely be able to get an NPDES permit for the chemicals even if they somehow were not outright banned under the Endangered Species Act.

The American Mosquito Control Association has lobbied Congress to pass HR 935, which would exempt mosquito control operations from the NPDES permit requirement altogether, allowing them to discharge whatever chemical without limits, monitoring or reporting requirements.

When Congress remained unreceptive to the idea, HR 935 was suddenly renamed the “Zika Control Act.”  Congress could potentially be forced to vote Yes on this bill if there’s sufficient panic about Zika.

The Senate is also scheduled to vote on whether to set aside another $1.1-B in funding to fight Zika

This is a virus that so far has not seriously harmed a 1 person in the US, and has not been proven responsible for the microcephaly cases in Brazil either.

This whole thing appears to be little more than a gift to the chemical industry at the expense of public health.

As noted: “The American Mosquito Control Association and the chemical companies can only benefit from huge hype and fear surrounding Zika. They NEED the populace to fear Zika so that Congress is forced to approve a terrible bill that would pollute/erode the Clean Water Act and eventually allow for Malathion and Naled [to] continue to be used despite data showing their effect on endangered species.”

That bring up this Big Q: Are we doing the right thing by waging war against pests with toxic chemicals?

It needs to be understood that there’s a price to pay, both in human and environmental health. We’re poisoning our world, and ourselves, in the name of protecting public health. There’s something inherently wrong with that position. Some are quick to say we have no other options, this not necessarily true.

Charles Murray, CEO of Penta5 USA based in Sarasota, FL, said recently, “Always available is our All-Natural ANYTIME no-bite Lotion and I guess for public awareness that something is being done, the authorities have decided to use a chemical solution for the environment [hopefully on a short term basis]. People don’t like chemicals and for sure bees and other insect life will be wiped out in that area.”

“Suggesting that all visitors and anyone threatened by mosquitoes use ANYTIME no-bite Lotion, packed in an easy to carry anywhere VialPaQ™ developed in Florida would appear to be a “no brainer”. Arrive off the plane or cruise liner  get a VialPaQ for the number of days in Florida. Check into a hotel get a VialPaQ for each day. Have these available at schools in the risk areas. Have them at all woman’s clinics and social security offices etc. This is taking a lead, a strong home grown solution based on results from Florida’s university to fall back on and now the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine agrees with their no-bite results.  All technical reports show the All-Natural ANYTIME no-bite solution is as good as the harmful chemical products used as a repellant by folks. Chemicals are not recommended for children and pets. So a risk area for our young ones.

The various leaders [Governor, Health, Agriculture and Tourism Departmental heads in Florida] are not being heard in DC, where they appear to be dithering around with the Zika problem. I do feel the leadership team will miss the opportunity to allay tourist fears if they don’t do something soon.”

Mr. Murray recommends for pregnant woman, schools, hotels, airport and  cruise lines that each individual be given a VialPaQ daily to ensure no-bites.

Penta5’s natural solutions are safe, and do no harm to the body or anyone else.

For more information go to: http://penta5usa.com/

Live a mosquito free life without toxins.

Stay tuned…

 

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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