Eat Real Food, Boost Your Mood

Eat Real Food, Boost Your Mood

Eat Real Food, Boost Your Mood

When feeling Blue, it is tempting to reach for the comforting foods (mostly junk), but the problem is these foods will ultimately make you feel worse.

“What you eat really does affect your mood. When you eat healthier, you do feel better,” Dr. Charles Platkin, PhD tells us.

“If you eat foods that are high in sugar you get a temporary lift, because your insulin spikes. But it also goes down too quickly, leaving you feeling worse than before,” says Dr. Platkin, Director of the NYC Food Policy Center in New York City.

The solution is to eat Real foods, which keeps your insulin, our hormone that turns sugar into energy, balanced, says Dr. Platkin, who is a bestselling author and writes “The Diet Detective,” a nationally syndicated column.

“To make sure you are eating healthy, that means not consuming added sugar, you really do have to be a detective, because food manufacturers are very skilled in hiding sugar under other names on labels,” he says.

According to Dr. Platkin, such names include: corn sweetener, corn syrup, dextrin, dextrose, glucose, fructose, honey, invert sugar, lactose, maltodextrin, maltose, mannitol, molasses, natural sweeteners, polydextrose, sucrose, syrup, turbinado sugar and xylitol.

“One way to avoid this is to eat Real whole, fresh foods, not those which are processed and loaded with preservatives and chemicals,” says Dr. Platkin.

People also are apt to turn to high-fat or fried foods in an attempt to boost their mood but this is also misguided.

“It’s much better to seek out foods that are high in fiber because this promotes satiety, which is the feeling of being full longer,” he writes.

Below is a list of the foods that Dr. Platkin turns to for a quick pick-me-up, as follows:

Vegetables: Whether they are cooked, steamed or raw, vegetables area great choice, because the sugar they contained is released more slowly. Broccoli, for instance, is very versatile, and baby carrots and peppers are great raw, they are crunchy and delicious.

Whole-wheat crackers: Crackers made from whole wheat are high in fiber, which makes you feel full. Be sure that they are made from 100 percent whole wheat, and that the label does not say “multigrain” or “made with whole grains,” because there may be just a few grains, mixed in with refined flour. Always avoid products with added sugar or other hard-to-pronounce ingredients, which denote processing and chemical additives.

Fruit: Fresh fruit is especially healthful with the peel left on because the fiber will help balance the sugar. Apples, pears, nectarines and peaches are good choices. Just be sure to limit the amount you eat because fruit metabolizes as sugar.

Protein: A small amount of protein is a good choice for a quick energy boost. Lean cuts of chicken or turkey, prepared without skin, fat or breading, is a good choice. A small portion of lean meat or fish also works, as long as it’s been prepared in a healthful way.

Nuts:Eating nuts before going into a meeting, or before an activity, is also good for extra energy. Watch the amount, though, because nuts have a high fat content. Often, just a few nuts will do it.

Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

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