An Apple a Day, Is a Good, Healthy Habit

An Apple a Day, Is a Good, Healthy Habit

An Organic Apple a Day, Is a Good, Healthy Habit

  • There are a lot of studies show how healthy Organic fruit is for us, Apples are no exception.

One study says that the peel is capable of benefiting endothelial function, blood pressure and atherosclerosis and reducing your risk of cardiovascular disease.

In the area of lung function alone, the research shows that the valuable compounds in Apples may help prevent and treat lung cancer, asthma and respiratory diseases, bronchial hyperactivity and persistent allergic rhinitis, not to mention Type 2 diabetes, asthma and several types of cancer.

But while it’s true that apples are a healthy food, moderation is Key, as the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) notes, the amounts of fruit you should eat per day vary depending on certain factors:

  • Children under 8: 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day
  • Children and teens: 1 1/2 to 2 cups of fruit per day
  • Women age 19 to 30: 2 cups per day, while women older than 30 — 1 1/2 cups per day
  • Men of any age: 2 cups of fruit per day

What the USDA do not note is that while fruits offer many vitamins, enzymes and minerals, they should be eaten in moderation due to fructose content, especially if you are insulin resistant.

And understand this please, drinking fruit juices does not provide the same benefit as consuming whole fruits.

As far as servings of Apples go, the same site broke it down to show that 1 small apple or 1/2 of a large 1 each constitute 1 cup, as does 1 cup of sliced, chopped, raw or cooked Apples. A 4-oz snack container of Applesauce counts as 1/2 cup.

This is why that’s important

Portion sizes, particularly for those eating a typically Western diet, are often bigger than they should be. And while many think drinking an 8-oz glass of juice would be good for you, the USDA National Nutrient Database shows that 8 oz of Apple juice have more sugar and less than a minute amount of fiber compared to a medium-sized Apple.

Similar numbers can be assumed for other fruits, as well. Specifically, a typical 8-oz glass of Organic juice contains:

  • 120 calories
  • .1 gram of dietary fiber
  • 24 grams of sugar

A medium-sized Apple itself has:

  • 95 calories
  • 4.4 grams of dietary fiber
  • 18.91 grams of sugar

If you have never seen a list of all the ways Apple Cider Vinegar, or ACV, benefits your health, you should definitely take a look.

Besides remedying things like bug bites, cuts and scrapes, athlete’s foot, sunburn, dandruff and more, fermented Apple juice, with its active ingredient, ascetic acid, has been shown by clinical studies to:

  1. Lower blood sugar levels: groups of adults with Type 2 diabetes, pre-diabetes and a healthy control group were given an oz of ACV, after which all had lower glucose levels, and those with either diabetes or pre-diabetes showed dramatic improvement.
  2. Sore throat soother: Combinations of ACV with the added bonus of other bacteria-fighting substances like lemon juice, honey, ginger and cayenne pepper not only soothes but heals sore throat pain.
  3. Boosts gut health: As a prebiotic, ACV helps maintain a beneficial balance in microbiota, and may as a consequence help prevent cardiovascular disease., 1 study noted: “Up to 90% of dietary plant polyphenols including apples, reach the colon intact. The interaction with the gut microbiota is reciprocal, since commensal bacteria transform polyphenols into simple aromatic metabolites while polyphenols have the ability to modulate the gut microbiota composition, inhibiting some bacterial populations and stimulating others.”
  4. Weight loss: A Japanese animal study reveals that mice given ACV with their meals developed 10% less body fat compared to their no-ACV counterparts, even when eating the same amount of high-fat food. Researchers concluded that humans could expect the same benefit.
  5. Urinary tract infections aka UTIs — Besides UTIs, studies show Apple Cider Vinegar may have an antibacterial effect on interstitial cystitis, aka painful bladder syndrome. Part of the action may come from the presence of quercetin in ACV, as well as the potassium, which may inhibit bad bacteria and promote the growth of healthy bacteria.

So, Eat healthy, Be healthy, Live lively.

Stay tuned…

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Paul Ebeling

Paul A. Ebeling, polymath, excels in diverse fields of knowledge. Pattern Recognition Analyst in Equities, Commodities and Foreign Exchange and author of “The Red Roadmaster’s Technical Report” on the US Major Market Indices™, a highly regarded, weekly financial market letter, he is also a philosopher, issuing insights on a wide range of subjects to a following of over 250,000 cohorts. An international audience of opinion makers, business leaders, and global organizations recognizes Ebeling as an expert.

2 Responses to "An Apple a Day, Is a Good, Healthy Habit"

  1. Linda Routman Salin   January 13, 2018 at 8:30 am

    I am not sure why the author thinks that apple cider vinegar would benefit interstitial cystitis as an antibacterial. IC is not bacterial and is not an infection. Despite vigorous research into the possibility IC is treated/cured with antibiotics, this is not a bacterial disease.

    • Paul Ebeling   January 16, 2018 at 12:56 am

      Because it does. Have a happy day. Paul

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